NSPS office reports transition on schedule and releases pay pool tools and guides

////NSPS office reports transition on schedule and releases pay pool tools and guides

NSPS office reports transition on schedule and releases pay pool tools and guides

The National Security Personnel System (NSPS) transition office reported that its program to transition former NSPS personnel to GS status is right on schedule.   According to the NSPS office's monthly update, 171,985 former NSPS employees have transitioned to GS pay plans as of September 30, 2010.  This is 75 percent of the 226,000 total NSPS employees and meets the end of year target set by the NSPS transition office in February.  Of those who have transitioned, 72 percent (124,200) have received salary increases.  Of the remainder, 21 percent (35,117) were placed in pay retention status and received no pay increase.  These employees' current pay is higher than that for their new GS classification. Those employees in pay retention status will receive 50 percent of future pay raises until their pay level comes in line with their new classification.  Another 7 percent (12,668) in matched step status also received no pay increase.  In other transition action, the NSPS transition office released updated pay tools and guides for the 2010 pay pool reconciliation process.  There are two sets of tools and guides: one set for those who will transition by December 31, 2010 and another set for those who will transition after January 1, 2011.  These guides are available on the NSPS website.

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One Comment

  1. Neil D. Friedman November 2, 2010 at 3:03 pm

    In my opinion, the reconversion from NSPS to GS resulted in a significant number of grossly unfair downgrades in my command. We recruited GS-14s from other commands who in good faith accepted NSPS Pay Band 2 positions
    here. Upon reconversion, they were downgraded to GS-13 due to the original classifications of the position, which were not supposed to mean anything in NSPS. While they were placed on “save pay,” they continue to suffer in competition for GS-15 positions and in not sharing in the pay increases for GS-14s. Poorly handled, DoD!

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